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SOWK 3013 Interviewing Skills in General Practice (BA): Find Articles

Scholarly / Peer-Reviewed vs. Popular/Trade

While wikipedia can sometimes be a good starting point, it is not considered "scholarly."  If you are you having trouble distinguishing between the peer-reviewed/scholarly journals from the trade publication or popular magazines, Below is a link to a document that will help explain the differences.  

REVIEW VERSUS RESEARCH

It is also important to be able to distinguish between review articles and research articles. A review article’s primary purpose is not to present new research, but to summarize, analyze, discuss, and provide an overview of previously published work on a topic. A research article is designed to present new research, methods, and/or findings. Research articles often employ the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Research, and Discussion) format. Below are a few articles of interest on this topic.

Suggested Keywords

This is not an exhaustive list, but should provide a good starting point for generating ideas.

Advocacy
African-American
Aging
Alcoholics
Anger management
Asian-American
Assessment
Bereavement
Boundaries
Burnout
Caregiving
Case management
Case work
Child abuse
Children
Communication
Community
Conflict
Counseling
Criminal
Cultural differences
Cultural pluralism
Death
Decision making
Demographic
Disabled
Disability
Discrimination
Disease
Diversity
Dying
Elder abuse
Elderly
Engagement
Ethnicity
Ethics
Ethnocentrism
Evaluation
Families
Feminist
Gay
Gerontology
Group dynamics
Hate
Health
Hispanic
HIV
Human dignity
Immigrant
Intervention
Interview
Intimacy
Latino
Lesbian
LGBT
Long-term care
Minority
Multicultural
Native-American
Nonverbal communication
Persons with disability
Politics
Poverty
Problem solving
Racial
Racism
Rapport
Refugee
Resolution
Self-help
Sexuality
Social class
Social interactions
Social justice
Social policies
Social problems
Social welfare
Sociopolitical
Stereotypes
Stress management
Therapy
Time management
Verbal communication
Well-being
Widowhood
Women

Useful Databases -- Sociology, Social Work and Political Science

Check out these databases if you are looking for scholarly articles.

 

Below are some databases that will be more relevant/useful for topics related to "sociology" and "social work."  Be sure to "scroll" down through the box to see additional choices.

Other Useful Databases

Here are some other databases that may prove useful to your research.

Searching Tips

There is a lot of content in this box, be sure to scroll down for additional tips/techniques.

  • Be prepared with synonyms for your search terms in case your original search produces limited results.  Use the "Subject Terms" or "Thesaurus" feature for the database you are searching for additional help with finding relevant subjects.
  • Pay attention to any search tips or help screens provided by each database.  Even experienced researchers (like professors and librarians!) can have trouble when dealing with a new interface.  Take the time to learn how to use the tool (database/print resource) -- it will help you to avoid frustration later.
  • Remember that most databases allow for Boolean Searching
  • Boolean Operators (AND, OR, NOT)
    • Use AND to focus your search and combine different aspects of your topic.
      • Example: global warming AND agriculture will return only those articles that contain both terms.
    • Use OR to expand your search and find synonyms/related terms.
      • Example: global warming OR greenhouse effect with return any article that contains either term.
    • Use NOT to exclude a word or phrase from your search.
      • Example: agriculture NOT soybean will return articles on every form of agriculture except soybean.
  • Phrase searching is another useful technique for narrowing a search to retrieve the most relevant results. 
  • Use quotation marks (") to search for an exact phrase.
    • Example: "greenhouse gas emissions" will only return hits on the exact phrase (not the individual words).
  • Wildcard and Truncation are also  useful techniques for expanding a search to retrieve all relevant results.  For example, type
  • Use a question mark (?) or a pound sign (#) to act as wildcard characters.
    • To use the ? wildcard, enter your search terms and replace each unknown character with a ?.
      • Example: ne?t would retrieve articles containing neat, nest, or next.
    • To use the # wildcard, enter the # in places where an alternate spelling may contain an extra character.
      • Example: am#eba would retrieve articles containing ameba or amoeba.
  • Use an asterisk (*) to find variations of a word.  Put an asterisk following the root of a word to find all variations of that word (including singular as well as plural).
    • Example: biolog* will retrieve documents containing the words biology, biological, biologist . . .
  • Grouping/Nesting
  • Use parentheses to assist is grouping like concepts togethers in the search string.
    • Example: saturn NOT (automobile or car) AND gases will return articles on Saturn, the planet, not Saturn the car manufacturer.
  • Proximity Operators
  • You can use a proximity search to search for two or more words that occur within a specified number of words (or fewer) of each other in the databases. Proximity searching is used with a Keyword or Boolean search.
  • The proximity operators are composed of a letter (N or W) and a number (to specify the number of words). The proximity operator is placed between the words that are to be searched, as follows:
  • Near Operator (N) - N5 finds the words if they are within five wordsof one another regardless of the order in which they appear.
  • For example, type tax N5 reform to find results that would match tax reform as well as reform of income tax.
  • Within Operator (W) - In the following example, W8 finds the words if they are within eight words of one another and in the order in which you entered them.
  • For example, type tax W8 reform to find results that would match tax reform but would not match reform of income tax.
  • In addition, multiple terms can be used on either side of the operator. See the following examples:
  • (baseball or football or basketball) N5 (teams or players)
  • oil W3 (disaster OR clean-up OR contamination)
  • Contact a subject specialist librarian for help:

If you need a better understanding of Boolean logic and searching, here are a few resources to help:

What is a Literature Review

Or, sometimes called a Survey of the Scholarship.

A literature review is a text written by someone to consider the critical points of current knowledge including substantive findings, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions to a particular topic. Literature reviews are secondary sources, and as such, do not report any new or original experimental work. Also, a literature review can be interpreted as a review of an abstract accomplishment.

Most often associated with academic-oriented literature, such as a thesis or peer-reviewed article, a literature review usually precedes a research proposal and results section. Its main goals are to situate the current study within the body of literature and to provide context for the particular reader. Literature reviews are a staple for research in nearly every academic field.

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